On the three common intestinal entamoebae of man, and their differential diagnosis
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On the three common intestinal entamoebae of man, and their differential diagnosis

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Published by s.n. in [S.l .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Intestines -- Parasites.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Caption title.

Statementby Clifford Dobell and Margaret W. Jepps.
ContributionsJepps, Margaret W.
The Physical Object
Pagination13p. :
Number of Pages13
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18938038M

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on the three common intestinal entamoebae of man, and their differential diagnosis. on the three common intestinal entamoebae of man, and their differential diagnosis By Clifford Dobell and Margaret W. Jepps Topics: ArticlesAuthor: Clifford Dobell and Margaret W. Jepps. It is now becoming generally recognized that there are three different amoebae which may be present in the human bowel—the harmless Entamoeba coli (Lösch) Schaudinn and “ Entamoeba ” nana Wenyon and O'Connor, and the pathogenic E. histolytica Schaudinn. We have discussed these three species in an earlier paper (), and there noted their chief distinctive by:   INTRODUCTION. The detection of Entamoeba histolytica, the causative agent of amebiasis, is an important goal of the clinical microbiology is because amebiasis is presently one of the three most common causes of death from parasitic disease. The World Health Organization reported that E. histolytica causes approximately 50 million cases and , deaths Cited by:

  An amoeba was found in the faeces of ten out of fourteen English goats from three different localities. The amoeba, of which a detailed description is given, is morphologically identical with Entamoeba debliecki of the pig and is therefore included in the same species.. A statistical analysis shows that the caprine strains of E. debliecki comprise two races distinguishable from one another by Cited by:   Amebiasis is caused by Entamoeba histolytica (see the image below), a protozoan that is found worldwide (see Etiology). The highest prevalence of amebiasis is in developing countries where barriers between human feces and food and water supplies are inadequate (see Epidemiology). ADVERTISEMENTS: The following points highlight the three important species of Entamoeba for which man is host. The species are: 1. Entamoeba Histolytica 2. Entamoeba Coli 3. Entamoeba Gingivalis. Species # 1. Entamoeba Histolytica: It was discovered by a Russian zoologist, Friedrick Losch in This is an endoparasite common in man, apes and monkeys, and [ ].   Laboratory Diagnosis Differential diagnosis among other amebae. Pathogenic Entamoeba species must be differentiated from other intestinal protozoa such as the nonpathogenic amebae (Entamoeba coli, E. hartmanni, E. gingivalis, Endolimax nana, Iodamoeba buetschlii) and the flagellate Dientamoeba fragilis. Morphologic differentiation among these.

  Entamoeba histolytica must be differentiated from other intestinal protozoa including: E. coli, E. hartmanni, E. gingivalis, Endolimax nana, and Iodamoeba buetschlii (the nonpathogenic amebae); Dientamoeba fragilis (which is a flagellate not an ameba); and the possibly pathogenic Entamoeba entiation is possible, but not always easy, based on morphologic characteristics of the. William A. Petri Jr., Rashidul Haque, in Goldman's Cecil Medicine (Twenty Fourth Edition), Amebic Liver Abscess. Amebic liver abscess is 10 times as common in men as in women and is unusual in children. The typical patient with an amebic liver abscess in the United States is an immigrant from an endemic area, a man aged 20 to 40 years with fever, right upper quadrant pain, leukocytosis.   The genus Entamoeba comprises six species, namely Entamoeba histolytica, E. dispar, E. moshkovskii, E. coli, E. hartmanni and E. polecki that live in the human intestinal lumen. Infections with Entamoeba species can result in either a harmless colonization of the intestine or invasion of the colonic wall and damage of other host tissues such as liver, lung and brain. Amoebiasis, also known amoebic dysentery, is an infection caused by any of the amoebae of the Entamoeba group. Symptoms are most common during infection by Entamoeba histolytica. Amoebiasis can be present with no, mild, or severe symptoms. Symptoms may include abdominal pain, diarrhea, or bloody diarrhea. Complications can include inflammation and ulceration of the colon with tissue death Complications: Severe colitis, colonic perforation, anemia.